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Port Bell on the shores of Lake Victoria is 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) away.

From left to right: Kampala skyline, Bahá'í House of Worship on Kikaaya Hill, Uganda National Mosque, Makerere University main building, skyscraper in central business district, and view over Victoria Lake Kampala is the capital and largest city of Uganda.

The city is divided into five boroughs that oversee local planning: Kampala Central Division, Kawempe Division, Makindye Division, Nakawa Division, and Lubaga Division. Surrounding Kampala is the rapidly growing Wakiso District, whose population more than doubled between 20 and now stands at over 2 million.

Before the arrival of the British colonists, the Kabaka of Buganda had chosen the zone that would become Kampala as a hunting reserve.

The area, composed of rolling hills with grassy wetlands in the valleys, was home to several species of antelope, particularly impala.

When the British arrived, they called it "Hills of the Impala".

The language of the Buganda, Luganda, adopted many English words because of their interactions with the British.

The Buganda translated "Hill of the Impala" as Akasozi ke'Empala - "Kasozi" meaning "hill", "ke" meaning "of", and "empala" the plural of "impala".

In Luganda, the words "ka'mpala" mean "that is of the impala", in reference to a hill, and the single word "Kampala" was adopted as the name for the city that grew out of the Kabaka's hills.

The city grew as the capital of the Buganda kingdom, from which several buildings survive, including the Kasubi Tombs (built in 1881), the Lubiri Palace, the Buganda Parliament and the Buganda Court of Justice.

Severely damaged during the late-1970s Uganda–Tanzania War, the city has since then been rebuilt with constructions of new construction of hotels, banks, shopping malls, educational institutions, and hospitals and the improvement of war torn buildings and infrastructure.

Traditionally, Kampala was a city of seven hills, but over time it has come to have a lot more.

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